Top 5 Tuesday | Hyped by Mom, but I Won’t Read ’em!

Top Five

Top 5 Tuesday! 

There are a few reasons I won’t read books my mom recommends.  First, they tend not to be my style at all.  They are exceptionally dense and heavy reads, which I’ve mentioned before I can’t handle lately.
Also, I have a mental block when it comes to my mom’s books.  Maybe I never grew out of thinking Mommy is so not cool?  Or maybe I still secretly harbor resentment from when my mom told me my favorite book was too ‘juvenile’…

For whatever reason, I’ll never read these books. 

Top 5 Tuesday was started by Shanah at Bionic Book Worm!

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HistorianThe Historian
by Elizabeth Kostova

To you, perceptive reader, I bequeath my history….Late one night, exploring her father’s library, a young woman finds an ancient book and a cache of yellowing letters. The letters are all addressed to “My dear and unfortunate successor,” and they plunge her into a world she never dreamed of, a labyrinth where the secrets of her father’s past and her mother’s mysterious fate connect to an inconceivable evil hidden in the depths of history.

The letters provide links to one of the darkest powers that humanity has ever known and to a centuries-long quest to find the source of that darkness and wipe it out. It is a quest for the truth about Vlad the Impaler, the medieval ruler whose barbarous reign formed the basis of the legend of Dracula. Generations of historians have risked their reputations, their sanity, and even their lives to learn the truth about Vlad the Impaler and Dracula. Now one young woman must decide whether to take up this quest herself–to follow her father in a hunt that nearly brought him to ruin years ago, when he was a vibrant young scholar and her mother was still alive. What does the legend of Vlad the Impaler have to do with the modern world? Is it possible that the Dracula of myth truly existed and that he has lived on, century after century, pursuing his own unknowable ends? The answers to these questions cross time and borders, as first the father and then the daughter search for clues, from dusty Ivy League libraries to Istanbul, Budapest, and the depths of Eastern Europe. In city after city, in monasteries and archives, in letters and in secret conversations, the horrible truth emerges about Vlad the Impaler’s dark reign and about a time-defying pact that may have kept his awful work alive down through the ages.

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Shadow of Wind

The Shadow of the Wind
by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

The international literary sensation, about a boy’s quest through the secrets and shadows of postwar Barcelona for a mysterious author whose book has proved as dangerous to own as it is impossible to forget.

Barcelona, 1945 – just after the war, a great world city lies in shadow, nursing its wounds, and a boy named Daniel awakes on his eleventh birthday to find that he can no longer remember his mother’s face. To console his only child, Daniel’s widowed father, an antiquarian book dealer, initiates him into the secret of the Cemetery of Forgotten Books, a library tended by Barcelona’s guild of rare-book dealers as a repository for books forgotten by the world, waiting for someone who will care about them again. Daniel’s father coaxes him to choose a volume from the spiraling labyrinth of shelves, one that, it is said, will have a special meaning for him. And Daniel so loves the novel he selects, The Shadow of the Wind by one Julian Carax, that he sets out to find the rest of Carax’s work. To his shock, he discovers that someone has been systematically destroying every copy of every book this author has written. In fact, he may have the last one in existence. Before Daniel knows it his seemingly innocent quest has opened a door into one of Barcelona’s darkest secrets, an epic story of murder, magic, madness and doomed love. And before long he realizes that if he doesn’t find out the truth about Julian Carax, he and those closest to him will suffer horribly.

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Life of PiLife of Pi
by Yann Martel

The son of a zookeeper, Pi Patel has an encyclopedic knowledge of animal behavior and a fervent love of stories. When Pi is sixteen, his family emigrates from India to North America aboard a Japanese cargo ship, along with their zoo animals bound for new homes.

The ship sinks. Pi finds himself alone in a lifeboat, his only companions a hyena, an orangutan, a wounded zebra, and Richard Parker, a 450-pound Bengal tiger. Soon the tiger has dispatched all but Pi, whose fear, knowledge, and cunning allow him to coexist with Richard Parker for 227 days while lost at sea.

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Pillars EarthThe Pillars of the Earth
by Ken Follett

Everything readers expect from Follett is here: intrigue, fast-paced action, and passionate romance. But what makes The Pillars of the Earth extraordinary is the time the twelfth century; the place feudal England; and the subject the building of a glorious cathedral. Follett has re-created the crude, flamboyant England of the Middle Ages in every detail. The vast forests, the walled towns, the castles, and the monasteries become a familiar landscape.

Against this richly imagined and intricately interwoven backdrop, filled with the ravages of war and the rhythms of daily life, the master storyteller draws the reader irresistibly into the intertwined lives of his characters into their dreams, their labors, and their loves: Tom, the master builder; Aliena, the ravishingly beautiful noblewoman; Philip, the prior of Kingsbridge; Jack, the artist in stone; and Ellen, the woman of the forest who casts a terrifying curse. From humble stonemason to imperious monarch, each character is brought vividly to life.

The building of the cathedral, with the almost eerie artistry of the unschooled stonemasons, is the center of the drama. Around the site of the construction, Follett weaves a story of betrayal, revenge, and love, which begins with the public hanging of an innocent man and ends with the humiliation of a king.

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Handmaid TaleThe Handmaid’s Tale
by Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid’s Tale is not only a radical and brilliant departure for Margaret Atwood, it is a novel of such power that the reader will be unable to forget its images and its forecast. Set in the near future, it describes life in what was once the United States, now called the Republic of Gilead, a monotheocracy that has reacted to social unrest and a sharply declining birthrate by reverting to, and going beyond, the repressive intolerance of the original Puritans. The regime takes the Book of Genesis absolutely at its word, with bizarre consequences for the women and men of its population.

The story is told through the eyes of Offred, one of the unfortunate Handmaids under the new social order. In condensed but eloquent prose, by turns cool-eyed, tender, despairing, passionate, and wry, she reveals to us the dark corners behind the establishment’s calm facade, as certain tendencies now in existence are carried to their logical conclusions. The Handmaid’s Tale is funny, unexpected, horrifying, and altogether convincing. It is at once scathing satire, dire warning, and tour de force. It is Margaret Atwood at her best.


 

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About Birdie

Don’t look for her in any bar, club, crazy raging party, or anywhere there may be a large gathering of strangers. She’s more likely to be found tucked into the corner of the couch watching one of her favorite shows, or preferably under a comforter with her current novel.

31 Responses

  1. oh god I love this post!!! XD for me it’s the opposite, I’m constantly recommending books to my mom and I’m such a NERD but she’s really into crime shows, and so many rec’s are piled up waiting for her lolololllll
    I think she’s only read one book I’ve recommended so far??? East of Eden by John Steinbeck, I haven’t lured her into reading my favorite gay love stories sadllyyyyyy

    Like

      1. Outlander is still on my shelf, I bought the physical copy and everything!!!! I need to read it as soon as I get through all my ARCs. I HAVE SO MANY TO READ ONCE I FINISH!!! including the rest of my favorite bearded brothersss c: c:

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  2. Nicole

    Shadow of the Wind is one of my favorite books and the one book I always recommend! I loved the Historian as well. Can’t say I loved Handmaid’s Tale, but glad I read it.

    Like

  3. Hahhahaha this is great! I had Marina from Carlos Ruiz Zafon on my TBR, now I added Shadow of the Wind! Thank you, Birdie’s mom! Great post! I think you wouldn’t like Pillars of the Earth, it’s a massive and rather depressing book (although I liked it!).

    Like

  4. Absolute Shannonigans

    I tried Life of Pi and could not get into it at all.

    Aww, The Handmaid’s Tale is an amazing book. If you have Hulu, the first season is basically the book. There are things that are changed, but it’s fairly faithful.
    But I get that it’s not for everyone. I actually didn’t finish it the first time I tried to read it… the second time it all kind of clicked for me.

    Like

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